WWII plane rescued from scrapyard to join D-Day anniversary flight

pic credit: Facebook Commemorative Air Force That's All, Brother

An iconic WWII aircraft that was recovered from an aviation scrapyard will join the commemorations to mark the 75th anniversary of the D-day landings

Recovered from an aviation scrapyard in Wisconsin U.S.A the restored C-47 troop carrier that served as a lead aircraft of the main invasion force will join other vintage planes at 75th-anniversary ceremonies in June.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) - Filled with paratroopers, a U.S. warplane lumbered down an English runway in 1944 to spearhead the World War II D-Day invasion with a message for Adolf Hitler painted in bright yellow across its nose: "That's All, Brother."

Seventy-five years later, in a confluence of history and luck, that plane is again bound for the French coast for what could be the last great commemoration of the Allied battle to include D-Day veterans, many of whom are now in their 90s.

After flying over the Statue of Liberty on May 18, the plane embarked for Europe with other vintage aircraft along the same route through Canada, Greenland and Iceland that U.S. aircraft travelled during the war. There, it and other flying military transports are expected to drop paratroop re-enactors along the French coast at Normandy.

"It's going to be historic, emotional," said pilot Tom Travis, who will fly That's All, Brother to Europe for the event. "It'll be the last big gathering."

Air Force historian Matt Scales said there's no question that the twin-engine plane is the same one that led the main D-Day invasion. It's now operated today by the Texas-based Commemorative Air Force, which preserves military aircraft.

CLICK HERE FOR FULL STORY AND PICTURES